Posts Tagged ‘classic cars’

Nissan Figaro: The Retro Open Top Classic Japanese Car

Posted by Stephen On Friday, May 6th, 2016

There’s a reason that retro cars are catch the eye of many car collectors – not only do they get more rare as time goes on, but they represent a bygone era while having underpinnings from a more modern age. This could explain why the Nissan Figaro, a retro car first introduced in Japan in 1989, was so popular during its limited production – and why it remains a collector’s item today.

The Nissan Figaro was originally only sold in Japan, but it eventually became very popular in the UK and Ireland after it was released officially in 1991. It was designed by Shoji Takahashi, who won a design competition for it, and has some resemblance to the 1960s Datsun Fairlady models. Unlike contemporary Mitsuokas, with their bolt-on retro-look parts, the Figaro represents a complete vision of what a modern car styled on 1960s principles would look like.

Nissan Figaro catalog

Only a limited number were produced, with the original 8,000 being supplemented by 12,000 more in order to meet demand. The car came in only four colors, which together represented the four seasons of the year: Topaz Mist, Emerald Green, Pale Aqua and Lapis Grey. Topaz Mist was the rarest, with only 2,000 models produced in this color.

Part of the inspiration for the car came from the theme of the 1989 Tokyo Motor Show, which was “Back to the Future”. Its name, “Figaro”, referred to the main character in Pierre Beaumarchais’ famous play, The Marriage of Figaro, based on the Mozart opera of the same name. A Nissan special projects group called Pike Factory, which specialized in producing niche automobiles such as the Be-1, Pao and S-Cargo, also worked on the Nissan Figaro.

Some features of the Figaro were leather seats, air conditioning, a CD player (which also had a retro radio look) and an open roof; furthermore, special limited edition cars included passenger side baskets and cup holders. The car was so rare that people who wanted to buy it had to enter a lottery, which increased its value even more and led to the modern-day perception of the Figaro as a rare car. Some parts can be hard to acquire, but many are available as they are also used in more common Nissan models of the time.

Nissan Figaro catalog

The fuel economy is an impressive 39 miles per gallon, but the a top speed of 106 miles per hour is somewhat lacking. Not surprising given the 60-horsepower engine. The Figaro’s genuine leather seats are a big draw for fans of this car. Not only do they look classy, but they add to a cabin environment that blends a distinctive complementary style. Adding to this is the low-mount headrest and synthetic leather piping that is used to prevent leather fatigue.

One of the Figaro’s most unique trademarks is its retractable top, which has an external design that is completely hidden in the trunk. The top is equipped with a double lock and warning buzzer as safety features, as well as a secondary hood latch that is designed to prevent the hood from opening while the car is being driven, or if it its activation switch is turned on by accident.

Features of the body include a flush mount apron and flush mount fender, as well as glassfibre resin material used with an outer gel coat for the car’s front fenders and front grill. The materials that are used result in body components that are durable and low-maintenance, which is especially helpful as it is difficult to find places to service and maintain the car. Fluoroplastic paint, which comes in the car’s signature four colors, is used on this vehicle.

Today, the best place to find Figaros for sale is the Japanese car auctions. With 7 to 8 million vehicles passing through each year, even rare vehicles like this one can be sourced with relative ease. Contact us to find out more.


Japanese Car Auction Find: Toyota AE86 — The Drifter’s Dream

Posted by Stephen On Monday, April 11th, 2016

The Toyota Corolla today is one of the most popular cars in existence, due to its small but durable size and budget-friendly pricing. However, few people know much about its history or what kinds of models went into making the final product. One of these earlier types was the Toyota AE86, which was introduced by Toyota in 1983 as part of the fifth generation Toyota Corolla, with the final models rolling off the production lines in 1987. As such, it is just one generation of the Toyota Corolla Levin and Toyota Sprinter Trueno spanning the years from 1972 to 2004.

There were some differences between the Levin and the Trueno, but to the general observer they were almost indistinguishable. The word “Levin” means “lightning” in Old English and “Trueno” means “thunder” in Spanish, making the two models an interesting play on words. Other than the names, the main difference between them was the headlights: while the Levin had fixed, rectangular headlights, the Trueno offered pop-up headlights instead.

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- front

One of the unique aspects of the AE86 was that it maintained a rear-wheel drive at a time when most other cars – particularly small hatchbacks – were switching over to front-wheel drive. As such, it is one of the last rear-wheel drive cars of its time. The AE86 body type was offered as either a 2-door coupe or 3-door liftback, which can also be called a hatchback. Other specifications included the 4-cylinder engine that was also used in other Toyota models of the time, as well as a 5-speed manual gearbox (although an automatic model was offered later as well).

Stopping and cornering on the AE86 was handled by ventilated disc brakes, as well as a MacPherson strut independent suspension at the front and a four-link live axle with coil springs bringing up the rear. Stabilizer bars were present at both ends of the car to make for a suspension system that was relatively sophisticated for what was a low-end model. All of this attention to detail lead to the fun handling that makes the car a stand-out model today in the minds of Japanese classic car enthusiasts.

During its production lifetime, the AE86 was well known for its achievements on the racetrack as well as the highway. The model was a popular choice for showroom stock, Group A, and Group N racing, and was found especially frequently in rallying and circuit races. Privateer teams continued to race the AE86 even after it was discontinued, and you can even find teams that race with this vehicle today. What makes it so appealing is its rear-drive configuration, which is not found in many other cars of the era and especially not in modern models of lightweight coupes.

The car was popular in races in Ireland and Finland, and also did well in international touring races where it competed mainly with Honda Civics and others lightweight vehicles of its type. In 1986, it was entered in the European Touring Car Championship and won the Manufacturers Championship, beating out larger cars including the BMW M6, BMW 325i (E30), Rover Vitesse, Volvo 240 Turbo, Merkur XR4Ti, Mazda 929, Holden Commodore (VK), Alfa Romeo 75 (turbo V6), and Mercedes 190E.

Japanese street racers, known as hashiriya, prized the AE86 as well for its light weight, relative strength and especially its rear-wheel driving configuration, which made it popular for races through mountain passes where downhill corners were particularly suited to the capabilities of this car. In particular, the AE86 was well adapted to drifting, or the process of controlled sliding through corners. Japanese drifters like Katsuhiro Ueo, Toshiki Yoshioka, Yoichi Imamura, Koichi Yamashita, Hiroshi Takahashi, Tetsuya Hibino, and Wataru Hayashi made the AE86 famous in the drift scene in the 1980s.

As a result of its popularity in Japan, the AE86 was found in many episodes of Japanese anime and manga; the model also made a brief appearance in Fast and Furious 4 and The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, indicating its popularity in American popular culture as well. It is also featured in a number of video game series, including Gran Turismo, Tokyo Xtreme Racer, Grand Theft Auto IV and Grand Theft Auto V. It also appears in several video games and movies in the Need for Speed franchise, including Need for Speed: Underground 2, Need for Speed: The Run (where it can be used in challenges and multiplayer events), Need for Speed: World, Need for Speed: Pro Street, and Need for Speed (2015 movie).

Here is a 1984 Sprinter Trueno GTV that is in the car auctions in Japan. The mileage is high, but that is typical for cars of this age. This car has a lot of aftermarket parts, and seems to be in relatively good condition considering its age:

“Grade 3.5, first registered March 1984, 204,874KM, GTV model, five-speed manual gearbox, AC, front adjustable suspension, rear lowered suspension, Watanabe magnesium 14 inch wheels, strut bar, earthing system, aftermarket shock absorbers, super muffler, aftermarket radiator, aftermarket upper hose and lower hose, Apex air cleaner, TRD plug courts, Tein front adjustable-type upper mount, AC does not work well and needs repair, interior grime, ???? (unreadable) hole in body work, seats sagging and cut, dashboard loose and cut, front cross member dented, rust underneath vehicle, corrosion and other marks as per map”

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- inspection report

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan-- rear

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- interior


Japan Car Auction Finds: The Retro (Nissan) Pao

Posted by Stephen On Friday, March 25th, 2016

The Nissan Pao was originally announced in October of 1987 at the 26th Tokyo Motor Show before production began in 1988. Its retro looks gave it instant appeal, such that when it first came out, you had to make a reservation to purchase it as it was intended as a limited edition.
The name itself was supposedly from a Mongolian word meaning a meeting house. To heighten the impact of this one-syllable name Nissan also just marketed it as the “Pao” without the Nissan name in front of it.

Between January and April of 1989 reservations were made and the car sold out in three months. It was very popular at the time and still is a coveted and collectible car. Nissan stopped production in 1990, so the car at auction (below) is one of the last ones off the line. Such is its status as a design icon that one is displayed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
As a 3-door hatchback, it does not really fit into modern car buying habits, but the cohesive retro looks have aged well, so that it is hard to believe that the design is getting on for 30 years old.

One great thing about the Pao is that it is one of the spinoffs of the K10 Nissan March / Micra. (The other two being the Figaro and Be-1.) As a result, many of the mechanical parts are still relatively easy to come by, which would not be true if it was a genuine low-volume vehicle.

Designer Naoki Sakaki is credited with the designs for both the Nissan Pao and Nissan Be-1.

Specifications:

  • It was available in three body colors: terracotta, ivory, olive gray and aqua gray and two interior colors: ivory and black.
  • It came with either a three-speed automatic or five-speed manual transmission and had a 1.0 liter engine.
  • It was a great city car, only needing 14.4 feet to turn.
  • It’s fuel economy is still impressive by 2016 standard, getting up to 51 mpg in the city and 79 mpg at a constant 37 MPH.
  • It featured a distinctive clam shell hatch in back with the glass section swinging up and bottom opened into a tailgate.
  • Part of the retro look was external door hinges and flap-up windows.
  • Even the AM/FM radio tape deck was built to look as if it were from the 1950s.
  • Despite its small size, it can seat up to five passengers.
  • Popularity Today

    With its unique appearance, people either seem to love or hate it. Nissan was taking a risk at the time in designing something completely different. It almost looks like a modernized version of a car from the 1950’s. It is a testament to its design that there are groups of fanatical enthusiast owners both inside and outside Japan.

    Now, if you want one, you would think the limited edition status of this vehicle would make it hard to come by, but you can always find some good examples in the auctions in Japan. Let’s have a look at one of these below.

    Here is the translation of the auction inspector’s report:

    “Grade 4, interior B, exterior condition B, first registered February 1990, normal roof, 2WD, FAT, AC, original stereo, original side visor and mats, original steel wheels, power steering, 108,326KM, fornt and rear seats have been re-covered, some roadworthiness test history (2010, 2012, 2014), sticker shows the timing belt has been replaced, interior grime and scratches, oil leak, wheels scratched, door mirrors scratched, minor scratches and minor dents, marks as per map”

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - inspection report

    The first thing to note is that this car has been graded 4, which is about the best you can expect from a 26-year-old car. This car also has a great-looking interior with the original retro stereo being retained, and all the seats having been re-done. For the avid collector, the downside would be that this is the fixed roof version, rather than the canvas top version. Of course, this means the option of open-top motoring is not available, but on the other hand the potential issues with the canvas top getting damaged or aging, resulting in rainwater leaks aren’t going to be a problem.

    Interested in buying cars like the Nissan Pao, or other Japanese collectibles? Get 14 days of guest access to Japan’s cars auctions and take a look for yourself.

    And don’t forget to check out these extra photos of this Pao at auction in Japan.

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - front 2

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction -rear

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction -interior

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - wheel

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - retro stereo


    1968 Datsun Fairlady in the Japanese Car Auctions

    Posted by Stephen On Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

    This has to be one of the best looking Japanese sports cars ever, with the closest rival being the original MX-5 Miata. Along with its Japanese sport scar contemporaries, the Honda S500 and Toyota Sports 800, SR311 Fairlady encompasses the essence of a genuine sports car. Not the bludgeoning horsepower warfare of supercars and hypercars, and not the cubic inch overkill of the North American muscle cars. No, this car is about the fun of driving. The pleasure of a winding road with the top down and the wind in your hair.

    40,000 of these little gems were produced between 1959 and 1970, with this one being one of the latest SR311 configurations that featured a 5-speed manual transmission that replaced the previous 4-speed. With a standard 135 PS engine configuration (in a car weighing only 940KG), a top speed of 120 MPH was attainable, which was quite spritely for its time and represented excellent value for money.

    Let’s take a look at this one that is in a Japan car auction in Tokyo. Here is the translation of the auction inspectors report:

    “Interior C, first registered 1968 (month not stated), five-speed manual gearbox, ODOMETER CHANGED, marked as odometer changed vehicle as this is an old car, fender mirrors, steering wheel worn and has minor cracks, canvas top cut and has repair marks, possibly aftermarket seats, seats torn, rust and corrosion and paint marks underneath vehicle, interior grime and wear, dashboard loose, rust and corrosion in places, corrosion repair marks, scratches and dents and repairs, exterior paintwork cracked on bonnet and on right side sill and on left rear side panel and on rear boot lid, marks as per map”

    Datsun Fairlady SR311 at auction in Japan - auction sheet

    Although it says that it is an “odometer changed vehicle”, this is very common among cars of this age, simply because the seller cannot be hundred percent sure that the mileage is completely accurate. This would really only be possible if there were full-service records available. So in this case as well, the seller is probably erring on the side of caution by marking the car as such.

    There is a reasonable amount of rust and corrosion on this car, so this would be more of a project vehicle. However, it’s not so bad that it is readily visible in the photographs. Take a look for yourself below:

    Datsun Fairlady SR311 at auction in Japan - front

    Datsun Fairlady SR311 at auction in Japan - rear

    Datsun Fairlady SR311 at auction in Japan - interior


    Japanese Car Collectors Predict Upcoming Trends

    Posted by Stephen On Thursday, February 25th, 2016

    Global trends do not only exist in the world of gaming, fashion, and animation. Japanese car collectors seem to have the inside scoop when it comes to the global car collector market. In the collector’s inventory lies the innovated limited production vehicles from the 1960s such as the Toyota 2000GT and Mazda Cosmo that are now priced at six and seven figure numbers. Even the humble vehicles like the Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40 of the 1960s have become $100,000 cars.

    Toyota 2000GT with Toyota 86

    “We’ve seen a huge spike in certain great, collectible Japanese cars,” says David Gooding, the CEO of the Los Angeles-based Gooding & Co. auction house. The information does back his statement. Study results from classic vehicle valuation experts Hagerty shows a 57% hike in the prices paid for Japanese collectibles during the last three years alone.

    With increases like this, many Japanese collectors have been priced out of their own iconic history. Since Japanese trends have been foretelling of global styles like the infamous Fast & Furious “tuner” craze from the early 2000s, where cars were customized with wildly colorful cosmetic and mechanical accessories—the Japanese collectible market has become a good source for analyzing emerging trends.

    The top collectible cars in Japan may line up with those that are popular globally, but there’s a significant difference. Japanese car collectors seem to be drawn to cars from the 1990s era and later while Ferraris from the 60s and 70s are a hot ticket item in America and Europe. European and American collectors currently fetishize purist 60s to 80s Porsche 911s that look like they just rolled off the assembly line; the Japanese clearly like their 911s customized. (Although the auctions in Japan can be a great place to find clean, low KM Porsches as well).

    “The Japanese have never been shy about modifying cars,” says Ben Hsu, founder, and editor-in-chief of Japanese Nostalgic Car, the most notable English-language publication about vintage Japanese cars. “Interest in Porsches in Japan has just skyrocketed in recent years, largely due to a tuner named Nakai, who grafts on flared fenders and giant rear spoilers—inspired by modifications done by the Japanese Bosozoku, which were the old local bike and car gangs. He runs a shop called Rauh Welt, which is German for rough world.”

    This love for modification is, among many Japanese collectors, ingrained in a particular aspect of their culture “There is this Japanese word, otaku, which means hardcore—obsessively enthusiastic about something,” says Hsu. According to Hsu’s, otaku is also the motivation behind local collectors’ love of oddball and underappreciated cars.

    What do you predict will be the next classic? The Nissan Figaro? Honda Beat? Whatever classic Japanese cars you are after, we can help.


    Subaru Alcyone / XT6 Trip Down Memory Lane

    Posted by Stephen On Saturday, February 20th, 2016

    Before you pull out the in the meantime gloves and tools to work on your favorite project car this weekend, let’s take a trip down memory lane. Our throwback Thursday car of choice is the 1988 Subaru Alcyone, known as the Subaru XT6 in the US. The very same car that boarded the EA 2 flat-4 that were found in all Subarus of that decade. If you know your old school cars, you know this engine is great for standard wagons and sedans but for a sports car, the engine was sadly underpowered despite the fact it was turbocharged when compared to the Supras and Zs.

    Fuji Heavy Industries got smart in ’88 when they released the XT6 with a 150-horseoower 2.7-liter flat-6 to make sure this model was something to be reckoned with against competitors. The light 2,200 pounds combined with the engine allowed the XT6 to fly like all sports car should. A lot of sports car drivers get pumped with adrenaline when they hear a powerful engine on the road, but that’s one thing this Subaru Alcyone didn’t have because this engine whispers, so they don’t hear you coming!

    So what made this old time favorite Subaru model stand out? Well, we know it wasn’t a loud engine so it must have been the full-time 4WD system that helped its power delivery in the handling department and off the line. It definitely beat the Supra and 300ZX in those departments! Another bonus this Subaru Alcyone held over the old XT models was the newly added 5×100 lug pattern hubs compared to the earlier 4×140 lug pattern. The 5×100 definitely helped with aftermarket wheels which weren’t possible before then.

    If you remember the XT6 when it was equipped with air suspension that improved your ride but it was prone to leakage later on down the line. If you so happen to own this old beauty, and the air suspension doesn’t fly for you, you could always swap it out with standard coil springs which are a sensible choice.

    The XT6 also came equipped with extremely durable wheels and a sporty interior so it was easy to fall in love with this car and I’m sure most owners gave this baby its own name. With all this glory, it’s no wonder that old Subarus seem to be a quite popular buy in 2016 when you check online listings of old and used cars. SO if you’re looking to rekindle an old car flame to make it your next car project, the XT6 is an excellent choice! You never know, you may even be able to find one in the Japanese car auctions.

    In the meantime, why not enjoy this retro review of this retro Japanese car?


    Ultra Rare Nissan Skyline GT-R Nismo Z-Tune For Sale in HK

    Posted by Stephen On Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

    One of the rarest R34’s in the world popped up for sale this morning in Hong Kong, according to Contempt Concept HK motors. The 2005 Nissan Skyline GT-R Nismo Z-Tune is being sold at a bargain of a mere $510,000.

    Nissan Skyline GT-R Nismo Z-Tune For Sale in HK

    What makes this rare?

    Let’s paint the picture. Not many R34 GT-Rs were ever manufactured. They stopped production in 2003. The, R34 V Specs represented only a handful of them – 1308 units to be exact. As far as the Nismo Z-Tune is concerned, there were only 17 production models. Two of them were never sold.

    That makes this vehicle one of 15 in the world in private hands.

    Although the R34 program ended in 2003, Nissan authorized an exclusive version of the R34 car dubbed the Nismo Z-Tune in 2005. Kinda like the Beatles getting back together for one, final concert in 1979. And only 15 people were lucky enough to get tickets. There have been more multi-million lottery winners in the world so far this year than that. That’s how rare these cars are.

    At an original price tag of $108,500, they sold out instantly. This particular car is No. 9 of the bunch.

    The entire car is handmade. Nismo purchased (20) secondhand Spec V’s and stripped them down. Each car was sprayed with a unique color called Z-Tune Silver and given an exclusive 2.8L twin-turbocharged engine. The car was given the ability of over 500 hp and could achieve 0 to 60 in 3.8 seconds. It maxed out at over 203 mph.

    The bodywork comes straight from their GT500 racing program. It has both a vented hood and fenders. Let’s not even get started on the suspension set up.

    This car has hardly been driven in the last 10 years. It has less than 2000 miles on the odometer. One might think that the asking price is a bit high at $510,000 – but not really. Think about it: This is one of the rarest Japanese supercars ever made.

    The steering wheel features the signature, iconic red and black leather that matches the front and back seats. The front seats feature the bucket seat race car design. You got racing paddle shifters and the red leather on the insides of the doors. Honestly, the car has a look of a Japanese supercar straight out of the Kill Bill film franchise.

    Everything’s been verified, right down to the nameplate and identification tag.

    Take a good, long look. This may be the last time you’ll ever see one for sale, and it won’t be for sale for long.


    Rare Porsche 911 Speedster at Auction in Japan

    Posted by Stephen On Thursday, June 25th, 2015

    I remember when these were first launched in the late 1980s. Basically a cut down 911 wide body emulating the classic 356 Speedster of an earlier era, the lack of dynamic improvement over the base 911 model meant these 911 Speedsters were seen as rather overpriced.

    But they do have one particular strength — they were built in very low numbers (2,065 to be exact) — and were immediately recognized as a collecting opportunity, despite the high asking price of 100,000 USD in the US market.

    This particular one has the added advantage of having only 4,200 miles on the odometer. It is a 1989 model, but imported into Japan in 1993, which does raise a small question mark over the mileage. However, the exceptional condition (grade 5 with A grade interior) and the fact that these were seen as collector’s items rather than daily drivers means that the low KM are quite realistic.

    Here is the full translation:

    “Interior A, first registered May 1993, Speedster model, 5-speed manual, odometer in miles, LHD, not known if gray or official import, 1989, seller claims it has 80 miles when imported, seats wrinkled, paint marks underneath vehicle, minor scratches and also dents, front windscreen stone scratches, marks as per map”

    A similar vehicle with more KM, but also owned by Mrs. Roy Orbison, was auctioned for 198,000 USD in January 2015, so I wonder how much this will sell for?

    Porsche 911 Speedster 1989 Japanese auction inspection report

    Porsche 911 Speedster 1989 rear

    Porsche 911 Speedster 1989 front

    Porsche 911 Speedster 1989 interior


    Japanese Car Auction Find – 1998 Mazda Miata (NB)

    Posted by Stephen On Thursday, June 4th, 2015

    1998 Mazda Miata

    Earlier this week, we looked at a compilation of first-drive reviews for the all-new fourth-generation 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata. Critical opinions ranged from “It’s better in every way,” to, “the car’s only competitor is the death of fun.”

    Today, we thought it would be fun to look back at one of the older Miata models from decades past – a 1998 Mazda Miata NB.

    This would’ve been the first model year in the second-generation of Mazda’s iconic roadster. We love the fact that the auction find here is in the classic forest green… This is the color most closely associated with the second-generation Miata, production code NB. Although the new Miata is designed as in homage to the original first-generation model, in our opinion its looks are closest to that of these second-gen models… If nothing else because the new Miata lacks the first-gen’s hallmark retractable headlights.

    1998 Mazda Miata rear

    Mazda made a surprising number of updates for the second-generation Miata, even if the most noticeable is the change in headlights due to safety regulations. For example, the Miata NB featured superior aerodynamics with a drag coefficient of 0.36. This didn’t actually result in much of a performance increase though since the new Miata gained about 150 lbs and kept the same 1.8L turbocharged engine that Mazda added as an option to the Miata in ‘94.

    However, that doesn’t mean that the mechanics weren’t without improvements…

    For example, this would’ve been the first car to use Mazda’s original Variable Intake Control System. The engine was also slightly tuned up to output 140 horsepower instead of 131. The engine also featured a higher compression ratio, and several of the parts were changed out for superior alternatives. Mazda also fitted the NB Miata with new wheels, better tires and bigger brakes, including the addition of anti-lock brakes.

    1998 Mazda Miata interior

    Even though it was relatively small, all of these mechanical upgrades DID have a real-world, on-the-road impact for this generation’s performance… The new NB raced from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in just 7.8 seconds, more than a half-second faster than the NA. It also has a fully unlocked top speed of 130 mph, unlike the first-gen Eunos models in Japan and Europe which were artificially capped at 112 mph.

    All in all, this 1998 Mazda Miata roadster is a car brimming with history. If you’d like to learn more about it, you can get a full translation of the auction sheet below:

    1998 Mazda Miata auction sheet

    “Interior C, first registered January 1998, VS version, FAT, AC, power steering, power windows, ABS, airbag, leather, stone chips in front window, interior grime, power windows not working, canvas top torn, wheels scratches, engine oil leak, worn and dented underneath vehicle, scratches and dents and wrinkles, spare wheel missing, marks as per map”


    Sixth-Generation Chevrolet Camaro Finally Unveiled

    Posted by Stephen On Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

    2016 Chevrolet Camaro

    Okay, we know it’s not every day that we cover non-Japanese cars here on the Integrity Exports blog. But, this is a special occasion. After several months of buildup, Chevy has finally unveiled the all-new sixth-generation Camaro which will go on sale in the US by the end of the year, and everywhere else in Q1 of ’16.

    First things first, you can see that Chevrolet has kept the classic Camaro image of the last few model years almost fully intact. The new car still looks very much like the Camaro you’d see on dealership floors today. However, Chevrolet has logged a solid 350 hours of windtunnel tweaking to hone the old Camaro into a sleeker, more aerodynamic machine.

    2016 Chevrolet Camaro rear

    Also, even though you wouldn’t be able to tell from the design, Chevy managed to trim a full 200 lbs. off the Camaro, which makes it noticeably more agile AND improves fuel economy up to 30mpg. They did that by making the car a tiny bit shorter and narrower, and it also rides a bit lower to the ground.  And you can’t see it, but the underpinnings are reportedly 28% more rigid too.

    Mark Reuss, GM’s executive VP of product development, expanded on the car’s design by saying, “For Camaro enthusiasts, it retains the iconic design cues and offers even more performance.”

    What exactly does he mean by ‘more performance’?

    2016 Chevrolet Camaro engines

    Looking to stay competitive with the Camaro’s arch nemesis – the Ford Mustang – Chevrolet will offer three different engines in 2016 and onward. First, the baseline trim will ship with a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine (pictured right) with 275 horsepower. Then, the mid-range model will come with a 3.6L V6 outputting 335 horses (pictured middle). The top-of-the-line Camaro SS gets an updated version of the Corvette Stingray’s LT1 V8 – 6.2L of raw combustion power that outputs a blistering 455 hp.

    2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS interior

    The SS also gets some big ol’ Brembo brakes. All plants come with driver’s choice of a six-speed manual with a Magnetic Ride Control system to help match rev speed during downshifting, or with an eight-speed Hydra-matic automatic transmission (complete with paddle shifters).

    Japanese Car Auction Find – 2002 Chevrolet Camaro

    2002 Chevrolet Camaro

    It’s not every day that you’ll find a decent Chevrolet Camaro up for auction in Japan, but today is our lucky day. What we have here is a 2002 model that’s in surprisingly good shape. This is probably one of the most nostalgic sports cars that you will still occasionally see on the road, which speaks well of the older Camaro’s longevity.

    2002 Chevrolet Camaro rear

    As a 2002MY, this Camaro would’ve been the last model in the fourth-generation before Chevy halted production of their sport coupe between 2002 and 2010, making this an extra special model.

    2002 Chevrolet Camaro interior

    For more information, get a full rundown of the specs from the auction sheet translation below:

    2002 Chevrolet Camaro auction sheet

    “Interior A, first registered July 2002, Camaro model, FAT, AC, original alloy wheels, power steering, power windows, airbag, Yanase official dealer left-hand drive import, 2002 model, rust on suspension parts, light scratches on roof, other marks as per map”