Posts Tagged ‘japanese car auctions’

Golden Week Vacation Period 2016

Posted by Stephen On Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Yes, that time of year has rolled around again and we are just about to enter the Golden Week holiday period. So that you aren’t caught out wondering what is happening with the auctions or any bank transfers you have sent, make sure you refer to the schedule below:

April 29th

Auctions: All open as usual.
Banks: Closed for Showa Day.

April 30th

Auctions: Almost all open as usual.
Banks: Closed as it is Saturday.

May 2nd

Auctions: All closed.
Banks: Open as usual.

May 3rd

Auctions: All closed.
Banks: Closed for Constitution Memorial Day.

May 4th

Auctions: Almost all closed.
Banks: Closed for Greenery Day.

May 5th:

Auctions: A few running, but most closed.
Banks: Closed for Childrens’ Day

May 6th:

Auctions: All closed.
Banks: Open as usual.

May 7th:

Auctions: Almost all closed.
Banks: Closed for Saturday.

May 9th and after:

All auctions and banking back to normal.

Please also note that our suppliers, such as transport companies, shipping companies, photographers etc will similarly have low availability or be closed during this period. This may result in some unavoidable delays.

While we will be checking email etc. regularly, we will be taking a break and will not be our usual hyper-responsive selves. Thank you for your understanding!


Japanese Car Auction Find: Toyota AE86 — The Drifter’s Dream

Posted by Stephen On Monday, April 11th, 2016

The Toyota Corolla today is one of the most popular cars in existence, due to its small but durable size and budget-friendly pricing. However, few people know much about its history or what kinds of models went into making the final product. One of these earlier types was the Toyota AE86, which was introduced by Toyota in 1983 as part of the fifth generation Toyota Corolla, with the final models rolling off the production lines in 1987. As such, it is just one generation of the Toyota Corolla Levin and Toyota Sprinter Trueno spanning the years from 1972 to 2004.

There were some differences between the Levin and the Trueno, but to the general observer they were almost indistinguishable. The word “Levin” means “lightning” in Old English and “Trueno” means “thunder” in Spanish, making the two models an interesting play on words. Other than the names, the main difference between them was the headlights: while the Levin had fixed, rectangular headlights, the Trueno offered pop-up headlights instead.

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- front

One of the unique aspects of the AE86 was that it maintained a rear-wheel drive at a time when most other cars – particularly small hatchbacks – were switching over to front-wheel drive. As such, it is one of the last rear-wheel drive cars of its time. The AE86 body type was offered as either a 2-door coupe or 3-door liftback, which can also be called a hatchback. Other specifications included the 4-cylinder engine that was also used in other Toyota models of the time, as well as a 5-speed manual gearbox (although an automatic model was offered later as well).

Stopping and cornering on the AE86 was handled by ventilated disc brakes, as well as a MacPherson strut independent suspension at the front and a four-link live axle with coil springs bringing up the rear. Stabilizer bars were present at both ends of the car to make for a suspension system that was relatively sophisticated for what was a low-end model. All of this attention to detail lead to the fun handling that makes the car a stand-out model today in the minds of Japanese classic car enthusiasts.

During its production lifetime, the AE86 was well known for its achievements on the racetrack as well as the highway. The model was a popular choice for showroom stock, Group A, and Group N racing, and was found especially frequently in rallying and circuit races. Privateer teams continued to race the AE86 even after it was discontinued, and you can even find teams that race with this vehicle today. What makes it so appealing is its rear-drive configuration, which is not found in many other cars of the era and especially not in modern models of lightweight coupes.

The car was popular in races in Ireland and Finland, and also did well in international touring races where it competed mainly with Honda Civics and others lightweight vehicles of its type. In 1986, it was entered in the European Touring Car Championship and won the Manufacturers Championship, beating out larger cars including the BMW M6, BMW 325i (E30), Rover Vitesse, Volvo 240 Turbo, Merkur XR4Ti, Mazda 929, Holden Commodore (VK), Alfa Romeo 75 (turbo V6), and Mercedes 190E.

Japanese street racers, known as hashiriya, prized the AE86 as well for its light weight, relative strength and especially its rear-wheel driving configuration, which made it popular for races through mountain passes where downhill corners were particularly suited to the capabilities of this car. In particular, the AE86 was well adapted to drifting, or the process of controlled sliding through corners. Japanese drifters like Katsuhiro Ueo, Toshiki Yoshioka, Yoichi Imamura, Koichi Yamashita, Hiroshi Takahashi, Tetsuya Hibino, and Wataru Hayashi made the AE86 famous in the drift scene in the 1980s.

As a result of its popularity in Japan, the AE86 was found in many episodes of Japanese anime and manga; the model also made a brief appearance in Fast and Furious 4 and The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, indicating its popularity in American popular culture as well. It is also featured in a number of video game series, including Gran Turismo, Tokyo Xtreme Racer, Grand Theft Auto IV and Grand Theft Auto V. It also appears in several video games and movies in the Need for Speed franchise, including Need for Speed: Underground 2, Need for Speed: The Run (where it can be used in challenges and multiplayer events), Need for Speed: World, Need for Speed: Pro Street, and Need for Speed (2015 movie).

Here is a 1984 Sprinter Trueno GTV that is in the car auctions in Japan. The mileage is high, but that is typical for cars of this age. This car has a lot of aftermarket parts, and seems to be in relatively good condition considering its age:

“Grade 3.5, first registered March 1984, 204,874KM, GTV model, five-speed manual gearbox, AC, front adjustable suspension, rear lowered suspension, Watanabe magnesium 14 inch wheels, strut bar, earthing system, aftermarket shock absorbers, super muffler, aftermarket radiator, aftermarket upper hose and lower hose, Apex air cleaner, TRD plug courts, Tein front adjustable-type upper mount, AC does not work well and needs repair, interior grime, ???? (unreadable) hole in body work, seats sagging and cut, dashboard loose and cut, front cross member dented, rust underneath vehicle, corrosion and other marks as per map”

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- inspection report

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan-- rear

1984 Toyota Sprinter Trueno at auction in Japan -- interior


Japan Car Auction Finds: The Retro (Nissan) Pao

Posted by Stephen On Friday, March 25th, 2016

The Nissan Pao was originally announced in October of 1987 at the 26th Tokyo Motor Show before production began in 1988. Its retro looks gave it instant appeal, such that when it first came out, you had to make a reservation to purchase it as it was intended as a limited edition.
The name itself was supposedly from a Mongolian word meaning a meeting house. To heighten the impact of this one-syllable name Nissan also just marketed it as the “Pao” without the Nissan name in front of it.

Between January and April of 1989 reservations were made and the car sold out in three months. It was very popular at the time and still is a coveted and collectible car. Nissan stopped production in 1990, so the car at auction (below) is one of the last ones off the line. Such is its status as a design icon that one is displayed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
As a 3-door hatchback, it does not really fit into modern car buying habits, but the cohesive retro looks have aged well, so that it is hard to believe that the design is getting on for 30 years old.

One great thing about the Pao is that it is one of the spinoffs of the K10 Nissan March / Micra. (The other two being the Figaro and Be-1.) As a result, many of the mechanical parts are still relatively easy to come by, which would not be true if it was a genuine low-volume vehicle.

Designer Naoki Sakaki is credited with the designs for both the Nissan Pao and Nissan Be-1.

Specifications:

  • It was available in three body colors: terracotta, ivory, olive gray and aqua gray and two interior colors: ivory and black.
  • It came with either a three-speed automatic or five-speed manual transmission and had a 1.0 liter engine.
  • It was a great city car, only needing 14.4 feet to turn.
  • It’s fuel economy is still impressive by 2016 standard, getting up to 51 mpg in the city and 79 mpg at a constant 37 MPH.
  • It featured a distinctive clam shell hatch in back with the glass section swinging up and bottom opened into a tailgate.
  • Part of the retro look was external door hinges and flap-up windows.
  • Even the AM/FM radio tape deck was built to look as if it were from the 1950s.
  • Despite its small size, it can seat up to five passengers.
  • Popularity Today

    With its unique appearance, people either seem to love or hate it. Nissan was taking a risk at the time in designing something completely different. It almost looks like a modernized version of a car from the 1950’s. It is a testament to its design that there are groups of fanatical enthusiast owners both inside and outside Japan.

    Now, if you want one, you would think the limited edition status of this vehicle would make it hard to come by, but you can always find some good examples in the auctions in Japan. Let’s have a look at one of these below.

    Here is the translation of the auction inspector’s report:

    “Grade 4, interior B, exterior condition B, first registered February 1990, normal roof, 2WD, FAT, AC, original stereo, original side visor and mats, original steel wheels, power steering, 108,326KM, fornt and rear seats have been re-covered, some roadworthiness test history (2010, 2012, 2014), sticker shows the timing belt has been replaced, interior grime and scratches, oil leak, wheels scratched, door mirrors scratched, minor scratches and minor dents, marks as per map”

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - inspection report

    The first thing to note is that this car has been graded 4, which is about the best you can expect from a 26-year-old car. This car also has a great-looking interior with the original retro stereo being retained, and all the seats having been re-done. For the avid collector, the downside would be that this is the fixed roof version, rather than the canvas top version. Of course, this means the option of open-top motoring is not available, but on the other hand the potential issues with the canvas top getting damaged or aging, resulting in rainwater leaks aren’t going to be a problem.

    Interested in buying cars like the Nissan Pao, or other Japanese collectibles? Get 14 days of guest access to Japan’s cars auctions and take a look for yourself.

    And don’t forget to check out these extra photos of this Pao at auction in Japan.

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - front 2

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction -rear

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction -interior

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - wheel

    Nissan Pao at Japanese car auction - retro stereo


    Japanese Car Collectors Predict Upcoming Trends

    Posted by Stephen On Thursday, February 25th, 2016

    Global trends do not only exist in the world of gaming, fashion, and animation. Japanese car collectors seem to have the inside scoop when it comes to the global car collector market. In the collector’s inventory lies the innovated limited production vehicles from the 1960s such as the Toyota 2000GT and Mazda Cosmo that are now priced at six and seven figure numbers. Even the humble vehicles like the Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40 of the 1960s have become $100,000 cars.

    Toyota 2000GT with Toyota 86

    “We’ve seen a huge spike in certain great, collectible Japanese cars,” says David Gooding, the CEO of the Los Angeles-based Gooding & Co. auction house. The information does back his statement. Study results from classic vehicle valuation experts Hagerty shows a 57% hike in the prices paid for Japanese collectibles during the last three years alone.

    With increases like this, many Japanese collectors have been priced out of their own iconic history. Since Japanese trends have been foretelling of global styles like the infamous Fast & Furious “tuner” craze from the early 2000s, where cars were customized with wildly colorful cosmetic and mechanical accessories—the Japanese collectible market has become a good source for analyzing emerging trends.

    The top collectible cars in Japan may line up with those that are popular globally, but there’s a significant difference. Japanese car collectors seem to be drawn to cars from the 1990s era and later while Ferraris from the 60s and 70s are a hot ticket item in America and Europe. European and American collectors currently fetishize purist 60s to 80s Porsche 911s that look like they just rolled off the assembly line; the Japanese clearly like their 911s customized. (Although the auctions in Japan can be a great place to find clean, low KM Porsches as well).

    “The Japanese have never been shy about modifying cars,” says Ben Hsu, founder, and editor-in-chief of Japanese Nostalgic Car, the most notable English-language publication about vintage Japanese cars. “Interest in Porsches in Japan has just skyrocketed in recent years, largely due to a tuner named Nakai, who grafts on flared fenders and giant rear spoilers—inspired by modifications done by the Japanese Bosozoku, which were the old local bike and car gangs. He runs a shop called Rauh Welt, which is German for rough world.”

    This love for modification is, among many Japanese collectors, ingrained in a particular aspect of their culture “There is this Japanese word, otaku, which means hardcore—obsessively enthusiastic about something,” says Hsu. According to Hsu’s, otaku is also the motivation behind local collectors’ love of oddball and underappreciated cars.

    What do you predict will be the next classic? The Nissan Figaro? Honda Beat? Whatever classic Japanese cars you are after, we can help.


    1996 Dodge Viper In The Japanese Car Auctions

    Posted by Stephen On Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

    The Dodge Viper is becoming a modern-day classic. With its stonking 8 liter engine, it may well rank as the last hurrah of fossil fuel power before hybrids arrived, and then gave way to all-electric power when historians look back at modern times in centuries to come.

    The exterior has aged well, but the shiny plastics of the interior wouldn’t even make it into an entry-level car these days. Find out more about this particular car that was auctioned in Japan, and enjoy the video below:

    1996 Dodge Viper at auction in Japan - interior

    1996 Dodge Viper at auction in Japan - rear

    1996 Dodge Viper at auction in Japan - auction sheet

    1996 Dodge Viper at auction in Japan - front


    Retro Sambar/ VW Bus Lookalike At Auction in Japan

    Posted by Stephen On Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

    Mitsuoka tries to do retro, but never seems to pull it off. The Nissan Figaro, now that is true retro. But what about this — a Suzuki Sambar kei van converted to look like an old VW bus? Personally, I think these are incredibly cute and look even better in the metal.

    Watch the video to see more detail of this particular one we found at auction here in Japan.

    VW-style Subaru Samar Dias - auction sheet

    VW-style Subaru Samar Dias - front

    VW-style Subaru Samar Dias - interior

    VW-style Subaru Samar Dias - rear


    Japan Car Auction New Year 2015 / 2016 Schedule

    Posted by Stephen On Thursday, December 24th, 2015

    A great 2015 draws to a close, but we are excited about where 2016 will take us. We hope you are also excited about your future plans for getting cars from Japan.

    The end of the year and the start of the new year always results in an unusual schedule, so please download the  PDF here that shows which auctions will be running on which days.


    How I Translate Japanese Car Auction Reports

    Posted by Stephen On Saturday, October 24th, 2015

    This is how i do it …


    Integrity Exports’ Car Auction System Upgraded

    Posted by Stephen On Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

    We are constantly improving and upgrading our online Japan car auction system, but one thing we are always wary of is complicating things. We know your goal is to find the best cars to bid on, and to get them at the best prices.

    Our latest upgrade is a great example of this kind of simple but powerful tweak. By changing the background colors in the auction car search screen, you can now tell in an instant whether you have already looked at a particular, car, whether you have put it on your watch list, or whether you have already bid on it.

    Check out the video below to see exactly what I mean.


    Japanese Car Auctions 2015 Obon Summer Vacation

    Posted by Stephen On Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

    The car auctions in Japan will be running a reduced schedule or be closed during some days in August 2015.

    Date Auction Status Integrity Exports’ Status
    August 10th Most running Normal
    August 11th Few running Bidding and emergencies only
    August 12th Few running Bidding and emergencies only
    August 13th Very few running Bidding and emergencies only
    August 14th No auctions Offices Closed
    August 15th No auctions Offices Closed
    August 16th No auctions Offices Closed
    August 17th Very few running Bidding and emergencies only
    August 18th Normal Normal

    Please note our suppliers will also be on a similar schedule. This means that you may be able to reach us, but we may not be able to get a response back from them until after the Obon holiday period is over. As a result, we will do our best to serve you, but we cannot guarantee we will be able to do that at our normal speed.

    If you have any questions about the car auctions in Japan, or the Obon auction schedule, please contact us here.